A Conversation with Dr Chad Briggs

I had the privilege of hosting Dr. Chad Briggs in my Climate and Security class at Sam Houston State University on June 22, 2020 for a conversation on the security dimensions of climate change. Dr. Briggs engaged the students about his new book (Co-authored with Dr. Miriam Matejova), U.S. DoD and Climate Change. His new … Continue reading A Conversation with Dr Chad Briggs

Why Kenya’s proposal to execute convicted poachers is a bad idea

Kenya Wildlife Service rangers on patrol at the Meru National Park. Flickr/IFAW Jeremiah Ogonda Asaka, Middle Tennessee State University Wildlife poaching in Kenya may soon be a capital offence, punishable by death. The proposal has surfaced because people believe existing penalties aren’t stringent enough, and because of the huge burden that poaching places on the … Continue reading Why Kenya’s proposal to execute convicted poachers is a bad idea

Why proposed death penalty for Kenya’s convicted poachers is ill advised

Kenya’s Cabinet Secretary (Minister) for Tourism and Wildlife last week announced plans to change the country’s wildlife law to make wildlife crime a capital offense punishable by death. Currently, a conviction of wildlife crime involving endangered and threatened species in Kenya attracts the severest punishment, which is life sentence or fine of not less than … Continue reading Why proposed death penalty for Kenya’s convicted poachers is ill advised

Why Kenya’s new wildlife task force is a step in the right direction

Pastoralist communities, like the Maasai, and their animals live in “bomas” which protect them from wild animals. Shutterstock/Papa Bravo Jeremiah Ogonda Asaka, Middle Tennessee State University Loss of biodiversity is one of the major global concerns of our time. According to four recently released scientific reports biodiversity – the essential variety of life forms on … Continue reading Why Kenya’s new wildlife task force is a step in the right direction

Kenya’s fresh election ruling: just another instalment in a highly contested process

Kenya’s Supreme Court judges preside before delivering the judgment that nullified last month’s presidential election Baz Ratner/Reuters Jeremiah Ogonda Asaka, Middle Tennessee State University Kenya’s 2017 general election has been one of the most litigated general elections since the country’s first multiparty poll in 1992. Just weeks before Election Day the country’s Independent Electoral and … Continue reading Kenya’s fresh election ruling: just another instalment in a highly contested process

Livestock-wildlife trade-offs for pastoral livelihoods in the conservancies of the Masai Mara — ILRI news

A new research paper, Trade-offs for climate-resilient pastoral livelihoods in wildlife conservancies in the Mara ecosystem, Kenya, was recently published in Pastoralism: Research, Policy and Practice, May 2017. The paper is co-authored by Claire Bedelian, of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Overseas Development Institute (ODI), and University College London (UCL), and Joseph Ogutu, of … Continue reading Livestock-wildlife trade-offs for pastoral livelihoods in the conservancies of the Masai Mara — ILRI news

what’s with the name doctoral ‘student’?

patter

One of the things I’ve been trying really hard to get over is the notion of the doctoral ‘student’. This is by far the most common way to refer to people doing a PhD, and it’s pretty hard not to use the ‘s’ word when it’s all around you. I think of myself as a recovering ‘s’ word user. I lapse occasionally, but I’m trying hard not to.

I want to use the term doctoral researcher instead – or dr for short. So, dr – not yet Dr but on the way. Just insert title (case) and the transition is complete.

Now, there are good reasons why the ‘s’ word persists. There is a fee for doctoral study, and yes, doctoral researchers are enrolled at a university. So this makes them students, just like any other students, right?

Well yes. But on the other hand…

One reason I dislike the…

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Half Earth of Whole Earth?

Bram Büscher

New paper out in Oryx:

Half-Earth or Whole Earth? Radical ideas for conservation, and their implications

Abstract

We question whether the increasingly popular, radical idea of turning half the Earth into a network of protected areas is either feasible or just. We argue that this Half-Earth plan would have widespread negative consequences for human populations and would not meet its conservation objectives. It offers no agenda for managing biodiversity within a human half of Earth. We call instead for alternative radical action that is both more effective and more equitable…

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